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1


The Brisbane Courier, Tuesday 8 June 1886, page 6




http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4483151




MONDAY, JUNE 7

BEFORE his Honour Sir Charles Lilley, C J.

GNECH v. GNECH AND LEE.

This was a motion before his Honour sitting in Matrimonial Causes Jurisdiction by Mr O'sullivan to order absolute decree nisi for dissolution of marriage, on the ground ofthe wife's adultery. The petitioner, Rudolph Gnech, is a farmer residing at Dugandan, formerly Tarampa, and he was married to respondent at the Lutheran Church, Minden on 27th November, 1883. Immediately after the marriage ceremony had been performed they returned to petitioner's farm at Tarampa, where they lived together until early in the month of February following.They then had some slight quarrel about his going to a public house, and Mrs. Gnech left her husband's house and went to her mother'splace at Fernvale, a few miles away. This was about midday, and, after she did not return that night or next morning, the petitioner went to Ipswich, and, after delaying a day or so, sailed to Sydney, and remained away till the following December. On his return he was arrested in Ipswich for wife desertion, and brought up before the police magistrate, who, however, made no order. Mrs Gnech swore she was earning 25s. a week at Finney, lsles,and Co's, and the police-magistrate decided she was not without means of support. This was absolutely false, Mrs Gnech never having worked at Finney, Isles, and Co.'s. After the case the petitioner asked the respondent to come and live with him again, which she agreed to do, stating at the same time that she would have to go to Brisbane to make arrangements first. He received a letter from her in which she refused to live with him, and co-habited with a man named Lee, who had married her believing her to be a single girl.

His Honour, it will be remembered, granted a rule nisi in this case on the 12th October, to be moved absolute six months from that date.

His Honour now adjourned the case until Wednesday for the production of an affidavit to show that the respondent and co-respondent had left the colony.





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





The Brisbane Courier, Tuesday 13 October 1885, page 6




http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3450465




SUPREME COURT.

MONDAY, 12TH OCTOBER,

BEFORE Sir Charles Lilley, Chief Justice.

IN MATRIMONIAL CAUSES JURISDICTION.

DIVORCE SUIT.

GNECH V. GNECH AND LEE.

A divorce suit, in which Rudolph Gnech was petitioner, Augusta Gnech respondent, and John Lee co-respondent, was heard before his Honour to-day.

Mr. Real, instructed by Messrs. Lilley and O'sullivan, appeared for the petitioner, and no appearance was made on behalf of either respondent or co-respondent.

The petitioner asked for a dissolution of marriage on the ground of his wife's adulterywith the co-respondent, and damages were sought to be recovered against the co-respondent.

Mr. REAL asked that the petition might be amended by the omission of the claim for damages, as if that were pressed it would be necessary for the case to go to a jury.

The CHIEF JUSTICE : I shall take it that you have abandoned formally your claim for damages. Of course I cannot assess damages.

The claim was allowed to be amended.

The petitioner is a farmer residing at Dugandan, formerly Tarampa, and he was married to respondent at the Lutheran Church, Minden, on 27th November, 1883. Immediately after the marriage ceremony had been performed they returned to petitioner's farm at Tarampa, where they lived together until early in the month of February following.They then had some slight quarrel about his going to a public-house, and Mrs. Gnech left her husband's house and went to her mother's place at Fernvale, a few miles away. This was about midday, and, as she did not return that night or next morning, the petitioner went to Ipswich, and, after delaying a day or so, sailed to Sydney, and remained away till the following December. On his return he was arrested in Ipswich for wife desertion, and brought up before the police-magistrate, who, however, made no order. Mrs. Gnech swore she was earning 25s. a week at Finney, Isles, and Co.'s, and the police-magistrate decided she was not without means of support. This was absolutely false, Mrs. Gnech never having worked at Finney, Isles, and Co.'s. After the case the petitioner asked the respondent to come and live with him again, which she agreed to do, stating at the same time that she would have to go to Brisbane to make arrangements first. A few days afterwards the petitioner received the following letter :

My dear husband, I just sit down to let you know that I am not coming on Satterday, and I will not live with you any more. You have left me. You hade left me for a long time without writing, and now I will live by myself, do not greeve over me. Darling. I have no more love for you, and if I did live with you I wold be unhappy with you, so It is best to me stay as I am. Stay where I am, and this will be all I can tell you

now.

I remain yours truely,

Loveing whiffe,

AUGUSTA GNECH

If you write to me, address me; Mrs. Gnech, Post Office, Brisbane.




He neither saw nor heard anything of his wife then for two months, when a man named Jacob Spresser told him something. He then went with Mr. G. R. Weise to Neumann's boarding house and saw his wife, and asked her to come and live with him again. She refused, and continued to cohabit with Lee, with whom she was then living. In June last petitioner gave instructions to his solicitor to take proceedings for dissolution of marriage and damages against Lee, not knowing at the time of the respondent being married to Leo. The petitions and citations were served by Mr. G. R.Weise, who knew the parties. No appearancewas entered within the proper time for eitherrespondent or co-respondent ; but on the 20th July Messrs. Foxton and Cardew, on behalf of Lee, wrote a letter to the effect that Mr. John Lee had consulted them with reference to proceedings taken by Mr. R. Gnech for a dissolution of his marriage from Ernestine W.A. Gnech, and for damages against their clientas co-respondent in the suit. Mr. Lee was married to Mrs. Gnech at Sydney on 7th June, 1884, she having at the time informed him that she was a single girl named Henrietta Devanstear. A copy of the marriage certificate was enclosed in the letter, and Messrs. Foxton and Cardew added that they were willing to allow Mr. O'sullivan, solicitor, Ipswich, to inspectthe original. The first notice their client re-ceived of his supposed wife as Mrs. Gnech was when he was served with the citation in this suit ; and upon speaking to Mrs. Gnech on the subject she denied being Gnech's wife, and even stated she did not know him. However, Mr. Lee had since made inquiries and now was satisfied that he had been shamefully misled by Mrs. Gnech, and he had refused to have anything more to do with her. Under the circumstances it was submitted by Messrs, Foxton and Cardew that the court would not make an order for their client to pay costs or damages ; and the simplest mannerof arranging the matter was for their client to appear in support of the petition, upon the other side giving an undertaking that they would not apply for damages or costs against him.

Of course, said Mr, REAL, in opening thecase they could give no such undertaking. He added that the respondent exhibited to Mrs. Neumann a document purporting to be a certificate of marriage with Lee.




The CHIEF JUSTICE : It is bigamy then ?

"Yes," Mr. REAL replied, "but there was no knowledge of that on the part of the petitioner at the commencement of the proceedings. She actually sued the petitioner for maintenance after that.

The CHIEF JUSTICE : Unless the co-respondent knew that she was a married woman he would not be liable for damages.

Mr. REAL : We cannot prove that he knew and it would be no use asking for damages in any case, as he is only a poor labouring man, and he has since left Brisbane.

The CHIEF JUSTICE : Under the circumstances he would simply be guilty of an immoral act. He would not be aware that he wasinjuring anyone.

The petitioner, Rudolph Gnech, a German, apparently about 33 years of age, gave evidence in support of the petition. His marriage to the petitioner, her separation from him, her cohabiting with the co-respondent, and his asking her to return to him were briefly stated by the witness, whose knowledge of English appeared to be rather imperfect.

Jane Betford, widow, daughter of the land-lord of the Railway Hotel, North Ipswich, which she managed for her father, stated that Lee and the respondent came to the hotel ;they lived in the boarding-house and slept in the same bedroom ; subsequently they rented a home from her father close to the hotel ; they represented themselves as man and wife throughout.

Caroline Neumann, wife of Carl Ferdinand Neumann, residing at Northbrook, formerly residing at North Ipswich, stated that Lee and the respondent rented two rooms from her ; they lived together as man and wife; the respondent, who called herself Mrs. Gnech, showed her a certificate of her marriage with Lee, and when she questioned her she denied having been married to or even knowing the petitioner.

G. R. Weise, grocer, Ipswich, and German interpreter at the Police Court there, stated that he know the petitioner and respondent, and he served copy of petition and citation upon the respondent ; he asked her to go back to her husband on one occasion, and she said she would if he would pay all expenses, whatever that might mean ; he asked her whether she did not think it was wrong for her to live with another man, and she commenced to cry; the respondent was the daughter of a small farmer living in the same neighbourhood as the petitioner's parents lived.

This was the case for the petitioner.

His HONOUR ordered a decree nisi for dis-solution of the marriage, to be moved absolute

in six months.




________________________________________ 
Devantier, Wilhelmine Ernestine Auguste (I6660)
 
2


The Courier-Mail, Monday 26 April 1943, page 5




http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42028565




Name of Deceased Proprietor:? Otto Ernst Wilhelm Devantier late of Linville.? Date of Death: 17th June. 1942.

Name of Claimant: Bertha Anna Devantier, of the same place, widow of deceased.?Description and Situation of Land: Subdivision 1 of resubdivision 17, and subdivision 7 to 9 of resubdivisions 15 and 16 of subdivision 2 of portion 25, county of Stanley, parish of Yerongpilly: portion 23 portion 30, and subdivision 1 of portion 27 and 29 and subdivision 3 of portion 39, county of Cavendish, parish of Colinton.?Estate claimed to be transmitted: Fee-simple .?Particulars of Will or Otherwise.?Will dated 3rd December, 1926.?Date within which Caveat may be lodged: 1st June, 1943. 
Devantier, Otto Ernst Wilhelm (I6664)
 
3 1945 'MT ISA INQUEST', Cloncurry Advocate (Qld. : 1931 - 1953), 16 February, p. 4. , viewed 15 Dec 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170736098

MT ISA INQUEST
On 12th instant an inquest into the death of Mrs. Phyllis May Devantier, who was fatally injured, on the Mt. Isa - Camooweal road, on the evening of December 31st., was conducted by the local coroner (Mr. L. H. Roles) assisted by Sergt. E. Thornton. Several witnesses were examined, but the main evidence was given by, Mr. Devantier, husband of deceased and Mr. Len Watson, driver of the second truck. William Devantier in his evidence said, that with others he went along to Spear Creek to a locality known as the seven-mile waterhole, where they had tea. Some time later they all got into the lorry and drove back to the main road. Robert Henry Kirkham was driving the truck. Witness was standing at the back of the truck's hood, Mrs. Kirkham and witnesses wife were also standing behind the hood. They travelled several miles and heard a motor horn blow from behind. He saw a truck pulled up about, 200 yards behind their lorry. He looked about their lorry and noticed that a hat belonging to Ro
bert Kirkham was missing and he thought the other lorry had picked it up. He attracted Kirkham's attention and said he thought the other lorry driver wanted them as they had sounded their klaxon. Kirkham pulled up and the ofher lorry pulled up along side and someone asked if there was anything wrong. Kirkham repiled that there wasn't. The ofher starfed up and they started immediately and a little later passed the olher lorry. A little later the other lorry passed them again and as it was coming up behind, Kirkham pulled to the left and slightly off the bitumen to allow it to pass. They then were travelling at about 20 m.p.h. After the other lorry passed, Kirkham pulled their lorry back to fhe middle of the road He heard Mrs. Kirkham call out something, he wasn't sure what, but he heard the word ''Phil.' He looked about and couldn't see his wife and hammered on the back of the hood to attract the driver's attention. He shouted to Kirkham that Phil had fallen off. He forth with jumped
off the lorry and ran back and saw his wife lying on the road behind the truck some distance, he noticed blood coming from one of her cars and he could see that she was unconscious. They put her on the truck and drove into Mt. Isa and with others he assisted to carry her into hospital. He was told that Dr. Thams was there. Later he saw his wife wheeled into the back portion of the hospital. He diet not again see his wife alive. His wife had complained of nerves, but had never suffered any serious illness. At the time Kirkham pulled the truck back on to the road after the other lorry passed he did not feel any violent swerve. They were not traelling at excessive speed. He believed his wife's death was purely accidental. Robert Henry Kirkham gave very similar evidence, as also did Mary Helen Kirkham and Ethel Millicant Ritchie. The driver of the other truck, Leonard Henry Watson, said he with others attended a National Fitness picnic and when returning along the Mt Isa - Comooweal ro
ad at about 5.30 p.m., he saw another truck ahead. His lorry travelled behind the other for some distance, and he intended to pass it, and blew the horn, but it broke. He pulled up to repair it. He started up again and pulled up alongside the lorry in front which had also pulled up. They started off again and while his lorry was in second gear the other lorry passed him. He drove on some short distance and passed the truck in front. He estimated he was, travelling at about 25 m.p.h. As he went to pass Kirkham's truck Kirkham pulled to the left to allow witness to pass. They had travelled some distance when R. J. Thomas, who was riding on witnesses truck, called out that a lady had fallen off the other truck. He pulled up and was going back to the assistance of the other people, when the truck came along, and he saw Mrs. Devantier lying on the back of the truck. Neither truck was travelling at excessive speed. To the best of his knowledge Mrs. Devantier's death was purely accidental.
A this stage the inquest was adjourned to a date to be fixed.
 
Norris, Phyllis May (I14624)
 
4 : George Schulz was born on September 8, 1862 in Kolberg, Prussia. He came to the United States with his mother, Marie Devantier Schulz, in August of 1869. The family first settled in Buffalo, New York where the last child was born, then moved to Cleveland, Ohio. George married Dorothy (last name and date unknown) and moved to Washington state in search of his fortune. According to family legend, he was shot in the back by a claims jumper and died in 1892. Schulz, Georg (I6765)
 
5 ?D?bt Christian Valdemar Hansen. Men fik ved kongelig bevilling, ?ndret sit navn Christian Valdemar Duvantier Duvantier, Christian Valdemar (I13928)
 
6 Also called Henry Devantier, Heinrich August (I7881)
 
7 Also called Michael Devantier Devantier, Michee (I72)
 
8 Anna M. Schulz was born on February 7, 1868 in Kolberg, Prussia. She came to the United States with her mother, Marie Devantier Schulz and nine siblings in August of 1869. Her family first settled in Buffalo, New York where the last child was born, then moved to Cleveland, Ohio. Anna was a music teacher who never married and lived with her other two single sisters, Elise and Martha, in later life. She died on October 5, 1931 in Cleveland, Ohio and is buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Cleveland with the rest of her family. Schulz, Anna M (I15280)
 
9 At Sea Lat 40'03N Lon 16'15 W Engle, Charlotte (I5105)
 
10 At Sea Ship Earl Dalhouse Engle, Charlotte (I5105)
 
11 August Devantier Devantier, August Friedrich Wilhelm (I6659)
 
12 Auguste Devantier Devantier, Wilhelmine Ernestine Auguste (I6660)
 
13 baptized Ernst Albert Gustav Devantier Devantier, Ernst Albert Gustav (I10343)
 
14 Baptized Marie Christine Michaelsen, Mary Christine (I8655)
 
15 Baptized Olaf Kristian Johannes Devantier
Chanhes his name in 1951 by deed poll to

Olaf John deVantier 
de Vantier, Olaf John (I564)
 
16 Barta Fischer Fischer, Bertha (I10349)
 
17 Between 1720-1726 Killemond, Marie (I1887)
 
18 Birthdate could also be 06 Jan 1745 Devantier, Judith (I9798)
 
19 Caroline Rodlund/Lund suffered a tragic death while she, her husband and three small children were shifting house on Radnor Road near Midhhurst. The wheel of the bullock wagon on which they were travelling dropped into a large hole throwing Caroline off and under the rear wheel. She died within a couple of hours.(source: Harwera & Normanby Star June 23 1896)
http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=TH18960620.2.9&srpos=3&e=-------10--1----0devantier-all


 
Rødlund/Rodlund, Caroline (I11321)
 
20 Charles F. Schulz was born on November 22, 1858 in Kolborg, Prussia. He came to the United States in 1868 with his mother, Marie Devantier Schulz, and nine siblings to meet his father, Karl Julius Schulz, who had arrived in the United States the previous year. After a brief stay in Buffalo, New York where an eleventh child was born, the family moved to Cleveland, Ohio. Charles married Claa (last name unknown) sometime about 1910. He was the superintendent of the waterworks in Cleveland, Ohio. Charles died on August 29, 1947 and was buried in Riverside Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio with the rest of his family Schulz, Charles F. (I6755)
 
21 D?bt Alfred Marius Hansen. Men fik d.4 december 1900 ved kongelig bevilling, ?ndret sit navn Alfred Marius Duvantier Duvantier, Alfred Marius (I2162)
 
22 D?bt Anker Honore Rasmussen, f?r bevilling til at ?ndre efternavnet til Honore Honore, Anker (I6975)
 
23 D?bt Hans Peter Carl Frederik Dupont S?rensen Dupont, Hans Peter Carl Frederik (I6832)
 
24 D?bt Hansen som efternavn Rasmussen, Rasmus Niels (I11944)
 
25 D?bt Hansen som efternavn Rasmussen, Peder Schack (I7599)
 
26 D?bt Karen Kirstine Devantier Andersen. Navne ?ndring 1972 Devantier, Karen Kirstine (I15792)
 
27 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Devantier, S. (I15791)
 
28 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Devantier, S. (I15781)
 
29 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Devantier, A.E. (I15761)
 
30 D?bt: Bror Abreham Peter Devantier Andersen. Navne ?ndring I 1979 Devantier, Bror Abraham Peter (I15759)
 
31 DEVANT1ER H C overl?ge, dr. med.; f. 31/7 1896 i Nyborg; s?n af postfuldm?gtig Christian Henriksen og hustru
Marie Sophie f. Devantier; gift (29/10 1922) m. Martha D., f. 22/10 1896 i Middelfart, d?d 1950, datter af k?bmand
Ole Peter Jensen og hustru Marie Kirstine f. S?rensen.

Student (Metropolitanskolen) 1913; med. eks. 1921; reservel?ge i Maribo 1922-24: assistent ved rigshospitalets kir.
poliklinik 1925-27 og ved serum-institutet 1925-30; 2. reservekirurg ved rigshospitalets afd. C 1927-29; assistent ved
Bispebjerg hospitals patologiske institut 1929-30 og 1931-32; dr. med. (Experimentelle Studier over lokal
Immunisering med Bakteriefiltrater) 1931; 2. reservel?ge ved rigshospitalets f?-deafd. B 1932-33; 1. reservel?ge
smstds 1933-35; 1. reservekirurg ved rigshosp.'s afd. C 1935-40; deltog i konkurrencen om professoratet i obstetrik og
gyn?kologi 1935; specialist-anerk. i kirurgi, obstetrik og gyn?kologi; overl?ge ved amtssygehuset i Fakse 19-42.

Adresse: Fakse.

http://www.rosekamp.dk/Kraks_BB_1957/D.htm
 
Devantier, Holger Christian (I12314)
 
32 DeVantier, Ray E.

Age 80, of Wheatfield, was called to his eternal glory on January 9, 2004 after a brief illness. Beloved husband of the late Elinor R. (Burow) DeVantier. Born May 28, 1923 in the Town of Wheatfield, NY to the late Hugo and Lily (Kroening) DeVantier. He is also survived by three children; Daniel R. DeVantier of Los Angeles, CA, Donna M. DeVantier of Wheatfield and Deborah D. (James) Bourne of Orchard Park; two grandchildren, Bradley and Elizabeth Bourne; one sister, Mildred DeVantier and one brother, Allen DeVantier both of Bergholz; and many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Friends may call at the DuBOIS FUNERAL HOME, 2436 Niagara Rd., (Bergholz) in Wheatfield on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 PM. Services will be conducted by the Rev. David B. Menz on Monday at 11:00 AM in St. James Ev. Lutheran Church, corner Niagara Rd. and Rohr Street in Bergholz.
Published in the Buffalo News on 1/11/2004
 
DeVantier, Ray Edward (I6588)
 
33 Died apr 27 1945 in Mecklenburg, trying to flee west, When the Russians advanced into Nazi Germany in 1945
 
Müller, Marie (I10189)
 
34 Died apr 28/29 1945 in Mecklenburg, trying to flee west, When the Russians advanced into Nazi Germany in 1945
 
Devantier, Anton Emil Paul (I10181)
 
35 Donald D. Schulz was born in Cleveland, Ohio, but later his family moved to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania where he attended Moravian Preparatory School. After school, Donald Schulz served his country as second lieutenant in the U.S. Army from October 1, 1918 to January 15, 1919 during World War I. Then he attended Lehigh University where he played for the all-American champion lacrosse team and was a member of Phi Gamma Delta. After graduating from Lehigh, Donald married Irene Frances Shillington on September 26, 1926 in the Moravian Chapel in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. During the earlier years of his marriage, Donald traveled a lot for his job to train others to run the equipment in new electrical power plants for the Foster-Wheeler Company. Then he became the power plant superintendent for the Scranton Electric Company in Scranton, Pennsylvania for twenty-five years and at the end of his career, the superintendent of the Brunner Island plant of the Pennsylvania Power and Ligh
t Company in York, Pennsylvania. When Donald and Irene Schulz moved to York, Pennsylvania they joined a Presbyterian church because there were no Moravian churches in the area. The couple was very involved in their church in York and Donald served as a deacon there. Donald died of colon cancer on June 7, 1974 in York, Pennsylvania. 
Schulz, Donald Devantier (I7139)
 
36 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Staples, D.F. (I7533)
 
37 Efternavn meget usikkert Asmussen, Helga Margrethe (I7619)
 
38 Efternavn uskikkert er m?ske ogs? Bottelet Dupont, Sara (Maria) (I3816)
 
39 Elise M. Schulz was born on December 31, 1855 in Kolberg, Prussia. She came to the United States with her mother, Marie Devantier Schulz and nine siblings in August of 1869. Her family first settled in Buffalo, New York where the last child was born, then moved to Cleveland, Ohio. Elise was a school teacher who never married and lived with her other two single sisters, Anna and Martha, in later life. She died on October 31, 1930 in Cleveland, Ohio and is buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Cleveland with the rest of her family. Schulz, Eliza M. (I6754)
 
40 Erich?ist?das?j?ngste?Kind?des?Rektors?des?hiesigen?Gymnasiums?Franz Devantier?und?seiner?Frau?Helene?geb.?Drost?aus?Jever.?Mit?seinen?Eltern und?vier?Geschwistern?lebt?er?im?Hause?Schlossstra?e?2.?Das?ger?umige Spielzimmer?im?Obergeschoss?ist?auch?bei?den?Nachbarskindern,?so?den drei? S?hnen? des? Pastors? Harms,? sehr? beliebt.? Erichs? Schwester? Lila? ist schon? in? jungen? Jahren? eine? begabte? Musikerin.? Der? M?rchenprofessor Wilhelm?Wisser,?ein?Freund?und?Kollege?des?Vaters,?ist?der?Patenonkel?der Schwester? und? geht? in? der? Familie? ein? und? aus.? Zu? Beginn? des? 20. Jahrhunderts?zieht?die?Familie?in?die?Auguststra?e?(heute?Albert?MahlstedtStra?e).?Das?idyllische?Familienleben?erh?lt?durch?den?pl?tzlichen?Tod?des Vaters? im? Jahr? 1907? einen? herben? Schlag.? W?hrend? Erich? noch? die Schulbank?dr?ckt,?leitet?sein??lterer?Bruder?Franz?jun.?im?Oldenburgischen Wilhelmshaven?eine?Werft.?Erich?macht?im?Jahr?1913?Abitur.?Obwohl?er andere?berufliche?Pl?ne?hat,?meldet?er?sich?am?28.?September?1914?als Kriegsfreiwilliger? zur? Infanterie,? er? tut? es? quasi? f?r? seinen? Bruder,? der unabk?mmlich?ist. Erich?kommt?am?17.?Dezember?1914?ins?Feld?nach?Autreches?bei?Soisson. Am?08.?Januar?1915?wird?der?Gefreite?in?die?Vogesen?verlegt.?Hier?k?mpft er?u.a.?auf?dem?Hartmannsweilerkopf.?Ostern?1915?kommt?er?zur?ck?nach Autreches.?Erich?wird?wegen?seiner?Tapferkeit?mit?dem?Eisernen?Kreuz?II. Klasse? ausgezeichnet.? Im? Oktober? 1915? k?mpft? er? bei? Souplet? in? der Champagne.? Der? im? Felde? abgehaltene? Weihnachtsgottesdienst? wird? zu Erichs?Freude?von?dem?Eutiner?Pastor?Zinzow,?der?als?Felddivisionspfarrer t?tig? ist,? gestaltet,? den? er? anschlie?end? mit? seinem? Schulfreund? Ernst Jessen,?der?ebenfalls?in?der?Champagne?liegt,?besucht.?Erichs?Regiment?ist hier?f?r?l?ngere?Zeit?stationiert,?am?26.?Februar?1916?f?llt?er?in?der?N?he von?Verdun. Seine?Schwester?Helene?heiratet?1917?den?verwitweten?Hofzahnarzt?Dr. Peter?Ochsen,?der?sp?ter?sechs?Apostelfiguren?f?r?den?Sch?nfeldt?Altar?der St.?Michaelis?Kirche?schnitzen?wird.?Die?Schwester?Lila?wird?als?erste?Frau im? Orchester? Furtw?nglers? spielen.? Die? beiden? Br?der? Franz? und? Carl arbeiten? beide? als? Ingenieure,? Carl? erwirbt? in? Spanien? bedeutende technische?Patente.?
 
Devantier, Erich (I11907)
 
41 ERNESTINE KRATZNER GREELEY DEVANTIER
Mrs. Gust Devantier, whose maiden name was Miss Ernestine Emilie Kratzner, died at the family home on Sunday evening, May 2, 1909.
Mrs. Devantier was born in Wisconsin in 1861 and moved with the family to Fayette County, IL. in 1866. In 1884, she was united in marriage to Ellis Greeley who preceded her to the Great Beyond in 1900. To this union were born four children, one having preceded her to the better land. Those being: Mrs. Wm. Gillespie, Miss Annie Greeley and Elmer Greeley survive.
In 1902, Mrs. Ellis Greeley was united in marriage to Gust Devantier. To this union one son, Walter C., was born. Mrs. Devantier leaves many relatives and friends to mourn her departure.
Funeral services were conducted from the Emmanuel Lutheran church at Altamont, IL., Tuesday afternoon, with interment in the church cemetery. (Effingham Democrat, May 14, 1909 
Kratzner, Amelia Kratzner (I5584)
 
42 Ernst Paul Edward Schulz was born on August 29m 1866 in Kolbeg, Prussia. He came to the Untied States with his mother, Marie Devantier Schulz, and his nine siblings in August of 1869. The family first settled in Buffalo, New York where an eleventh child was born, then moved to Cleveland, Ohio. Ernst married Agnes Krause in 1893 in Cleveland, Ohio. The couple later moved to Bucks County in Pennsylvania with their family. Ernst was a commercial artist. He died in August of 1942, but the location of his burial is unknown. Schulz, Ernst Paul Edward (I6766)
 
43 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Bursøe, N.J. (I6017)
 
44 F?rste s?ndag efter p?ske Hansdatter, Anna (I28)
 
45 Frank J. Schulz was born in Buffalo, New York to Karl and Marie Devantier Schulz, recent immigrants from Prussia. His family moved to Cleveland, Ohio. He married Nina Bell Thomas on October 11, 1911 in Cleveland, Ohio. Frank was post office clerk. He died on February 9, 1924 and is buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio with the rest of his family.
 
Schulz, Frank J. (I6757)
 
46 Friedrich Wilhelm August Devantier in USA Devantier, Frederich Guillaume (I4186)
 
47 From the New Zealand Book Council

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Du Fresne, Yvonne (1929 - 2011) was a fiction writer whose works, set in the Danish-French Huguenot community, are among the finest literary examinations of non-British European cultures in New Zealand.

Born in Takaka, du Fresne moved to the North Island at age three and was brought up in the Danish-French Huguenot settlement of the Manawatu. Her writing shows a strong affinity with the regions landscape.

Du Fresne trained as a teacher in Christchurch, qualifying in classroom music and voice teaching, and specialised in teaching music. As a teacher, she has worked in Primary Schools, at Wellington Teachers' College, and at the Correspondence School, for which she was also a drama scriptwriter. Three radio plays have been broadcast on National Radio, ?The Spring?, ?The Ship?, ?A Little Talk About Our Winter District?.

Her collection of short fiction, Farvel and other stories (1980) won the PEN Best First Book Award and was read over the radio as ?Astrid of the Limberlost?. At this time du Fresne travelled to writers conferences at Aarhus and Kiel Universities on a travel award from the Danish Ministry of Culture.

This debut was followed by a novel, The Book of Ester (1982), and a collection of linked stories The Growing of Astrid Westergaard (1985). Astrid Westergaard features the same Danish New Zealand protagonist as Farvel and was also adapted for radio.

Both collections, writes Nina Nola in the Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature ?attempt to establish a connection between the non-British European migrants and Maori.? The Womens Press published a selection of the stories as The Bear from the North (1989) with the subtitle ?Tales of a New Zealand Childhood?.

The Book of Ester also has a Hugenot protagonist, whom critics described as a grown up Astrid Westergaard. After the death of her Danish husband, Ester traces the course her forbears took to arrive in New Zealand, and finds consolation in the arms of a fellow Dane.

Frederique (1987) is deeply engaged with European history and the mythical world of Danish folklore. While visiting Denmark in 1980, du Fresne discovered an entry in her family records about a young woman - the Frederique of the title - who was wounded during the assassination of her parents by French Catholic agents in 1723. This story was the seed for the novel, set in 19th century New Zealand.

In Motherland (1996), Astrid Westergaard, returns to Denmark and has a reunion with her Danish relatives. ?As romance flourishes,? writes Janet Wilson in NZ Listener, ?du Fresne brings into suggestive parallel the deeper exploration of Astrids psyche that love urges with the rediscovery of her roots in Jutland.?

?Interweaving Astrid's story with an underlying enquiry about nationality, and brilliantly controlling the surface elements of mystery and romance, she has written more than a moving and believable story.?

Over her publishing career Yvonne du Fresne received a number of literary awards and scholarships in New Zealand and Denmark. After winning the best first book award for Farvel, she was twice runner-up in the New Zealand Book Awards for The Growing of Astrid Westergaard and The Book of Ester.

While on a Writers Residence at Aarhus University Jutland, Denmark in 1999, du Fresne established future writers residencies for New Zealand writers at that university .

In reviewing Motherland in New Zealand Books, Heather Murray could as easily be describing du Fresne's oeuvre when she writes: ?[Y]es, it is a story of coming to terms with one's heritage but du Fresne avoids the pitfalls of the well done-over topic. She writes so beautifully and puts such a new edge on it all, that the reader finds everything to enjoy.?

Yvonne du Fresne passed away in Wellington on the 13 March 2011, aged 81.

 
du Fresne, Yvonne (I14374)
 
48 Gardziec,Poland now Wolff, Albert (I15293)
 
49 He got the Last name Fischer, when his mother married August Fischer Devantier, Ernst Albert Gustav (I10343)
 
50 He was born with the lastname Krakow Fischer, Otto Friedrich Joachim (I10345)
 

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